UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING REPORT WRAP 02/09

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STORY: UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING REPORT WRAP
TRT: 3.35
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
FORMAT: PAL 4:3

DATELINE: 12, 10 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT 2009, NEW YORK CITY UNITED STATES

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

12 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Maria Costa, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
"The statistics speak loud and clear. It is not only trafficking from South East Asia into other parts of Asia, or into Western Europe, its not only from Latin America to North America, these are the kind of flows that you probably have in mind. There is a lot of exploitation within countries like the U.S., large countries like some African countries, but also in smaller countries."
4. Cutaway, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Maria Costa, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
"With economic hardship in the third world but not only, a greater number of people are more likely to be more vulnerable now than they were, especially for labour related forms of exploitation, child labour and so forth."

FILE – UNICEF / 19 OCTOBER 2008, BISHKEK, KYRGYZTAN

6. Med shot, children in centre for homeless (blurred faces)

FILE – UNICEF / MONROVIA, LIBERIA

7. Various shot, women in safe house (Blurred faces)

FILE – UNICEF / DATE UNKNOWN, RIO DE JANEIRO BRAZIL

8. Wide shot, prostitutes in street

10 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY, UNITED STATES

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Maria Costa, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
"The report by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime on human trafficking I would say more than being an explanation a presentation, of the severity of the problem, is an indictment against the international community for not doing enough."

FILE – UNICEF / 20 NOVEMBER 2008, NATAL, BRAZIL

12. Wide shot, girl sitting on the curb of a street approached by man
13. Wide shot, girl standing against a wall

10 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY, UNITED STATES

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Maria Costa, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
"There are probably one person out of one hundred which are actually rescued, how many criminals are indicted and convicted, perhaps four to five percent of the number of criminals in the world, so we are trying to measure the reality but for the time being member states are not being as cooperative as they should be in providing all the information needed."

FILE – UNICEF / 4 NOVEMBER 2008, GUATEMALA CITY, GUATEMALA

15. Wide shot, dimly lit street corner with two girls being approached by men

FILE – UNICEF / 15 NOVEMBER 2008, MOMBASA, LIBERIA

19. Various shots, women (blurred faces) at nightclub

11 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY, UNITED STATES

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Maria Costa, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
"The question of women being trafficked and also women being responsible for trafficking is one of the most dramatic ones. Gender bias against them is the root of the problem of being exploited, women being exploited, but we see more than in any other crime, we see women being the perpetrators."

12 FEBRUARY 2009, NEW YORK CITY

19. Various shots, launch of the UNODC global report on trafficking in persons and presentation of actress Mira Sorvino as Goodwill Ambassador
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Mira Sorvino, actor and United Nations Goodwill Ambassador as part of the United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking:
"Like the rest of us Americans I thought that, certainly in our country, slavery had ended when Lincoln freed the slaves, and the civil war was fought and eventually we had equality in this country but it's not the case. I mean even within America there is a great deal of slavery in various forms, there is sexual slave labor, there is sweatshop labor, there migrant farm worker labor, there is child prostitution, child pornography."
21. Various shots, conference and actress Mira Sorvino


STORYLINE

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) launched a new report today at the United Nations. A first of its kind, the report reflects the state of the world's response to human trafficking containing information from 155 countries and territories.

At a press conference in New York, UNODC's Executive Director Antonio Maria Costa told journalists that trafficking was happening all over the world and that exploitation was occurring within countries like the U.S. and other large countries in Africa.

Costa also pointed out that due to the present global economic crisis, a greater number of people were more likely to be more vulnerable now, especially for labour related forms of exploitation and child labour.

In an interview on Tuesday with UNTV, Costa said that the UNODC's report on human trafficking was more than an explanation of the severity of the problem, it was an "indictment against the international community for not doing enough."

According to the report, the number of convictions for human trafficking is increasing especially in a "handful of countries." Yet Costa says that they are trying to measure the reality. For the time being he said, "member states are not being as cooperative as they should be in providing all the information needed."

The report also denounces the fact that although the victims of sexual exploitation are predominantly women and girls, in 30 percent of the countries which provided information on the gender of traffickers, women make up the largest proportion of traffickers.

Costa said that being gender bias is the root of the problem of exploition, "we see more than in any other crime, we see women being the perpetrators."

The report's release also coincided with the appointment of actress Mira Sorvino as a U.N. goodwill ambassador to help fight human trafficking.

Sorvino said during an interview with UNTV that like the rest of the American people, she thought that slavery had ended in the United States when President Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves, "but it's not the case. I mean even within America there is a great deal of slavery in various forms."

The protocol, "United Nations Protocols against Trafficking in Persons" entered into force in 2003. It shows that in the past few years, the number of members states seriously implementing the Protocol has doubled. However, there are still many countries -particularly in Africa- that lack the necessary legal instruments or the will to do so.